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Tutorial

This library is meant to be used both on the server side and on the client side. The typical use case should follow the subsequent steps:
  1. 1.
    On the client side, generate the client and server keys.
  2. 2.
    Send the server key to the server.
  3. 3.
    Then any number of times:
    • On the client side, encryption of the input data with the client key.
    • Transmit the encrypted input to the server.
    • On the server side, homomorphic computation with the server key.
    • Transmit the encrypted output to the client.
    • On the client side, decryption of the output data with the client key.

Setup

In the first step, the client creates two keys: the client key and the server key, with the concrete_boolean::gen_keys function:
use tfhe::boolean::prelude::*;
fn main() {
// We generate the client key and the server key,
// using the default parameters:
let (client_key, server_key): (ClientKey, ServerKey) = gen_keys();
}
  • The client_key is of type ClientKey. It is secret, and must never be transmitted. This key will only be used to encrypt and decrypt data.
  • The server_key is of type ServerKey. It is a public key, and can be shared with any party. This key has to be sent to the server because it is required for homomorphic computation.
Note that both the client_key and server_key implement the Serialize and Deserialize traits. This way you can use any compatible serializer to store/send the data. For instance, to store the server_key in a binary file, you can use the bincode library:
use std::fs::File;
use std::io::{Write, Read};
use tfhe::boolean::prelude::*;
fn main() {
//---------------------------- CLIENT SIDE ----------------------------
// We generate a client key and a server key, using the default parameters:
let (client_key, server_key) = gen_keys();
// We serialize the server key to bytes, and store them in a file:
let encoded: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&server_key).unwrap();
let server_key_file = "/tmp/tutorial_server_key.bin";
// We write the server key to a file:
let mut file = File::create(server_key_file)
.expect("failed to create server key file");
file.write_all(encoded.as_slice()).expect("failed to write key to file");
// ...
// We send the key to server side
// ...
//---------------------------- SERVER SIDE ----------------------------
// We read the file:
let mut file = File::open(server_key_file)
.expect("failed to open server key file");
let mut encoded: Vec<u8> = Vec::new();
file.read_to_end(&mut encoded).expect("failed to read key");
// We deserialize the server key:
let key: ServerKey = bincode::deserialize(&encoded[..])
.expect("failed to deserialize");
}

Encrypting Inputs

Once the server key is available on the server side, it is possible to perform some homomorphic computations. The client simply needs to encrypt some data and send it to the server. Again, the Ciphertext type implements the Serialize and the Deserialize traits, so that any serializer and communication tool suiting your use case can be employed:
use tfhe::boolean::prelude::*;
fn main() {
// Don't consider the following line; you should follow the procedure above.
let (mut client_key, _) = gen_keys();
//---------------------------- SERVER SIDE
// We use the client key to encrypt the messages:
let ct_1 = client_key.encrypt(true);
let ct_2 = client_key.encrypt(false);
// We serialize the ciphertexts:
let encoded_1: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&ct_1).unwrap();
let encoded_2: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&ct_2).unwrap();
// ...
// And we send them to the server somehow
// ...
}

Encrypting Inputs using a public key

Once the server key is available on the server side, it is possible to perform some homomorphic computations. The client simply needs to encrypt some data and send it to the server. Again, the Ciphertext type implements the Serialize and the Deserialize traits, so that any serializer and communication tool suiting your use case can be utilized:
use tfhe::boolean::prelude::*;
fn main() {
// Don't consider the following line; you should follow the procedure above.
let (client_key, _) = gen_keys();
let public_key = PublicKey::new(&client_key);
//---------------------------- SERVER SIDE
// We use the public key to encrypt the messages:
let ct_1 = public_key.encrypt(true);
let ct_2 = public_key.encrypt(false);
// We serialize the ciphertexts:
let encoded_1: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&ct_1).unwrap();
let encoded_2: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&ct_2).unwrap();
// ...
// And we send them to the server somehow
// ...
}

Executing a Boolean circuit

Once the encrypted inputs are on the server side, the server_key can be used to homomorphically execute the desired Boolean circuit:
use std::fs::File;
use std::io::{Write, Read};
use tfhe::boolean::prelude::*;
fn main() {
// Don't consider the following lines; you should follow the procedure above.
let (mut client_key, mut server_key) = gen_keys();
let ct_1 = client_key.encrypt(true);
let ct_2 = client_key.encrypt(false);
let encoded_1: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&ct_1).unwrap();
let encoded_2: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&ct_2).unwrap();
//---------------------------- ON SERVER SIDE ----------------------------
// We deserialize the ciphertexts:
let ct_1: Ciphertext = bincode::deserialize(&encoded_1[..])
.expect("failed to deserialize");
let ct_2: Ciphertext = bincode::deserialize(&encoded_2[..])
.expect("failed to deserialize");
// We use the server key to execute the boolean circuit:
// if ((NOT ct_2) NAND (ct_1 AND ct_2)) then (NOT ct_2) else (ct_1 AND ct_2)
let ct_3 = server_key.not(&ct_2);
let ct_4 = server_key.and(&ct_1, &ct_2);
let ct_5 = server_key.nand(&ct_3, &ct_4);
let ct_6 = server_key.mux(&ct_5, &ct_3, &ct_4);
// Then we serialize the output of the circuit:
let encoded_output: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&ct_6)
.expect("failed to serialize output");
// ...
// And we send the output to the client
// ...
}

Decrypting the output

Once the encrypted output is on the client side, the client_key can be used to decrypt it:
use std::fs::File;
use std::io::{Write, Read};
use tfhe::boolean::prelude::*;
fn main() {
// Don't consider the following lines; you should follow the procedure above.
let (mut client_key, mut server_key) = gen_keys();
let ct_6 = client_key.encrypt(true);
let encoded_output: Vec<u8> = bincode::serialize(&ct_6).unwrap();
//---------------------------- ON CLIENT SIDE
// We deserialize the output ciphertext:
let output: Ciphertext = bincode::deserialize(&encoded_output[..])
.expect("failed to deserialize");
// Finally, we decrypt the output:
let output = client_key.decrypt(&output);
// And check that the result is the expected one:
assert_eq!(output, true);
}